November, 2012

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Bubble Wrap…And All That Jazz….Verbal Spontaneous

November 28th, 2012 By cgadmin

 

Spontaneous problems often add an additional element to the verbal problem solving that you should practice so your team is not caught off guard and gets frustrated during competition.

 

An example is that kids are assigned a number by where they sit in the spontaneous room and when time begins a card is turned over and the kids answer when their number comes up. These often do not go in order and one member may have two cards before another member’s comes up. A team member may also be asked to answer, and then turn over the card for the next member. THIS IS NOT ALWAYS EASY for some kids. They forget to turn it over, or turn it over before the answer is given. Judges tend to be patient with this, but it does lose some time. The worst is when another member attempts to turn over the card or reminds the team member to turn it over. Again, most judges will not penalize for this but the team may lose points if the kids appear to “fuss” at each other this. SUGGESTION- practice this! Get two sets of old playing cards and use the numbers one – seven (depending on the number of team members you have), and with two decks you will have eight cards of the same number. Or, get some note cards and put numbers on them.

 

Another way to use cards is to give each kid a certain number, like six cards and two free passes. Kids get extra points if they do not use the pass cards. In this case the team needs to try not to use the pass cards in order not to lose points. It can be used with strategy. The kids that are “hot” that day don’t need to use them, and the team member who is struggling can use them. A team member who finds verbal problems easy may run through all six cards quickly and then the team member who struggles is stuck with three cards left and no answers. Agh! Those left are then more likely to throw in pass cards. Team members may also get worried by seeing an actual number of cards and be in a hurry to throw in cards and not give creative answers. When all of the cards are done then the problem is done. SUGGESTION-practice this. I suggest you have the kids still take turns throwing in a card and answering the question so that even though they do not have to go in order they will still tend to take turns and not use the pass cards. Let them know though that they can practice not taking a turn and let the others still put in a card.

 

For younger Division I teams, or when first beginning to learn how to both answer and remember to do something else, practice with bubble wrap so each kid has to pop the bubble wrap before giving them her answer. Again, this is often easier said than done at first. Then add putting a card in the center of the table and saying an answer. Then change it to saying an answer and then putting in the card. Move on to the other two ways that I discussed in the beginning. This is a process that takes some time. Have fun with it and realize this is easier for some than others but everyone can learn it. Practicing it will give the team confidence before competition.

Filed Under: Coaches Mentor Blog

Coaches Training

November 28th, 2012 By cgadmin

 

Coach Training is a must for the first and second year coaches. There is so much that is taught and discussed in a fun and informative format in a short period of time and it gives you a beginning to what I call the “Odyssey toolkit.” How frustrating to struggle through a season with no support, especially when the coach training is readily available. It is a fun and organized day where you learn various aspects of the Odyssey program and who and how to contact for questions. Attempting to coach a team without coach training is like putting a puzzle together with some of the pieces missing‚ frustrating, and in the end you find they are missing and are frustrated because you did not know they were missing in the beginning‚ go to coach training‚ you save money, too. If you miss it, make sure you read the materials and ask questions. We want you to succeed so the kids succeed.

Filed Under: Coaches Mentor Blog

Required Tournament Date Participation

November 28th, 2012 By cgadmin

 

Most of you (Coaches) have completed training! Woo hoo! One of your first meetings should be with at least one of the parents/guardians. Ask them to bring a calendar for review and recording of dates. Go over the required tournament dates (both regional and state) for any conflicts and have parents agree that his/her child will be there! Get a commitment for both the regional and state tournaments because there is no way to know at the beginning of the season, and even on tournament day what team is going to score at the top. If there is a serious conflict with the date please get this resolved up front, or contact the Association Director (AD), Calla Pott, or me for guidance. Odyssey is about problem solving, so we want to model that as an organization, if possible. There is often a solution, especially if addressed early. You do NOT want to find out a child (who has some of the largest lines in the skit, as would be your luck) cannot make the tournament two weeks before the date’s not fair to you as a coach, to the team mates or the kid herself, who likely has no control. In addition, please bring up the World Finals date and a brief discussion of the obligation (see the AD or me for more on this) so parents are not surprised at this next step in competition at the State tournament when their child’s team wins! I also suggest a contract signed by both the parent and child (a sample is in the Coaches Training Handbook-Role of the Coach). Make sure all of the kids understand what they are signing.

Filed Under: Coaches Mentor Blog